ACL Wood

All Things Bright And Beautiful

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Mimbo the iPhone Robot Mimics Your Emotions

Mimbo the iPhone Robot Mimics Your Emotions
Interested in robotics, but building a robot seems too complex and you can’t afford an Asimo? The folks at Instructables have a solution: Mimbo, a simple, iPhone-based robot in a cardboard body that mimics your facial expressions. At first glance, Mimbo isn’t really all that interesting: it c…

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New ad for Sao Paulo’s I.A.R (Recycling Environmental Institute), by agency Ageisobar. This Brazilian artist’s work sends a powerful message; using sand to represent water depicts the depressing reality of the future water crisis.

Filed under I.A.R Ageisobar Water crisis art advertising

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choucribechir:

The Billboard Is Watching You
Being an admirer of creativity, I think this is awesome !
Amnesty International came up with a great interactive advertisement in 2009. The organisation’s one-off domestic violence awareness billboard is first to respond to people looking at it by using an eye-tracking camera that changes the poster’s display when a viewer looks at the image.  
The billboard was created to let people directly experience how domestic violence is hidden from view of the public. It is meant to motivate people to look more closely in the future and help prevent domestic violence. At first, the billboard shows a depiction of what domestic violence looks like; when people look directly at the billboard, the image changed into the same people in the first image pretending to be a normal, happy couple after a slight time delay.
It is great to see this kind of technology being used to raise awareness about such an important issuer that more people need to open their eyes and not only see, but know that they can also help prevent it from happening.Click on the picture above and see how it works.
Other creative ads/campaigns you might like:Google Chrome | Sony Bravia | John Lewis | Childhood Obesity | Schweppes | Canon Pixma | Embrace Life | Docomo | Scholz & Friends | Purple Feather | Water Ink | GE & GOOD | BMW | Dirt Devil | Head | Mini Cooper  | Samsung Galaxy S2 | Chanel | Crazy Ones | Lay’s 

choucribechir:

The Billboard Is Watching You

Being an admirer of creativity, I think this is awesome !

Amnesty International came up with a great interactive advertisement in 2009. The organisation’s one-off domestic violence awareness billboard is first to respond to people looking at it by using an eye-tracking camera that changes the poster’s display when a viewer looks at the image.
 

The billboard was created to let people directly experience how domestic violence is hidden from view of the public. It is meant to motivate people to look more closely in the future and help prevent domestic violence. At first, the billboard shows a depiction of what domestic violence looks like; when people look directly at the billboard, the image changed into the same people in the first image pretending to be a normal, happy couple after a slight time delay.

It is great to see this kind of technology being used to raise awareness about such an important issuer that more people need to open their eyes and not only see, but know that they can also help prevent it from happening.

Click on the picture above and see how it works.

Other creative ads/campaigns you might like:
Google Chrome | Sony Bravia | John Lewis | Childhood Obesity | Schweppes | Canon Pixma | Embrace Life | Docomo | Scholz & Friends | Purple Feather | Water Ink | GE & GOOD | BMW | Dirt Devil | Head | Mini Cooper  | Samsung Galaxy S2 | Chanel | Crazy Ones | Lay’s 

Filed under Interactive billboard Amnesty international advertising

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In her paintings, Amanda Clyne achieves a striking contrast between the sensitive representation of her subjects, and the rigid sliced effect of the overall image.

Here is what she says about the process:

I begin my process by culling images from fashion magazines. Cropping the image into a portrait, I re-print the image on to a surface to which the printing ink does not adhere, so the image remains wet. I photograph the print as the fluid image morphs and dissolves over time. I then compose a new image from fragments of these photographs—each image each is comprised of slices of the image at various stages of dissolution. Once I have resolved the final composition, I project the basic outlines of the image onto a canvas, and use a print-out of my composition as a painting reference. Each fragment is taped off and painted separately. Because of the narrow width of the fragments (some are less than 1/4 inch wide), I usually paint every third fragment, then while I wait for those fragments to dry, I paint alternating fragments on a different painting. Some paintings require three or four rounds of painting, so I work on several paintings at once.  (quote via Colossal)


Filed under Amanda Clyne Fashion portrait art painting